A Hard Shell Travel Case for a CPAP Device

Since my obstructive sleep apnea is severe I must take my CPAP with me any time that I travel. Otherwise, I’ll feel terrible the next morning. Unfortunately, the device came with a soft case that doesn’t provide the device, and more importantly the mask and hose, any protection from being damaged.

This week I decided to purchase a hard shell case that would offer more protection. I didn’t want to have to keep asking others to be careful about putting their luggage on top of the CPAP case. It wouldn’t take much to break the mask or hose (though the device itself would probably fine).

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An Inexpensive Airport Replacement for a 2006 iMac

The Short Version: The Airlink Wireless N Mini USB Adapter (AWLL6075) works well for an iMac with a broken Airport adapter. The software could be less obtrusive but for the cost (and size of the adapter) it’s a good buy. It doesn’t load until the user is logged in so it can’t be used to connect to network services such as Screen Sharing or File Sharing without first logging in and running the software.

After I upgraded the processor in my iMac from a Core Duo to a Core 2 Duo I discovered that the Airport in the iMac wouldn’t work. The system didn’t show any errors and the card appeared to work, but it couldn’t detect any networks (neither mine nor my neighbors). I opened the system up a few times to see if I could spot the problem and even tried re-seating the card but nothing helped. My best guess is that I may have damaged the antenna.

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Upgrading My White 2006 iMac Core Duo to a Core 2 Duo and Installing OS X Lion

Not very long ago I added a post explaining why I didn’t think it would be worth upgrading the processor in my Core Duo iMac and also why I wasn’t in a hurry to upgrade to Lion. Well, as often happens, I wasn’t satisfied with those conclusions and eventually decided that the benefits outweighed the effort involved.

This post won’t include step-by-step instructions – just some general information and maybe a few tips. However, I do think it was indeed worth upgrading my iMac to be able to run Lion.

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Resolving Problems Syncing iPhone App Docs with iCloud (When Using Multiple, Migrated MobileMe Accounts)

I migrated our MobileMe accounts to iCloud the day it was released, after updating my iPhone to iOS 5. I was using two accounts. One account is my primary and I synched mail, calendars, contacts, etc using it. I had another account that I only used for e-mail.

Overall, my transition to iOS 5 and migration of the accounts went without any major issues.

Well, that was the case until I tried to use Pages, Numbers, and Keynote on the iPhone with the new iCloud sync capability. For each app I turned on the “Use iCloud” option but every time I opened one of the apps the setting reverted back to off and in the iCloud Website it just showed the intro pages for the apps.

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Should You Change Your CPAP/APAP Settings?

Should you? Do you have a right to do this? Can it benefit you? For a more expanded opinion please visit my Living with a CPAP page.

Here’s the short answer:

It depends, but probably not.

Personally, I think patients should be able to monitor CPAP stats and make minor adjustments if the stats show areas where an improvement can be made (for example, increasing the minimum pressure supplied by an automatic CPAP device (APAP).

But here’s why you probably shouldn’t do this. If your DME and/or insurance company requires proof of compliance via downloading machine usage data then you shouldn’t change anything. Yes, it’s easy, but the insurance company might be able to declare that the act of changing settings is non-compliant (or they could claim that you’re not in compliance because you changed your settings). You might lose coverage or at the least have a lot of explaining to do.

When should you do this? My best guess is only if you’re not dealing with an insurance company or if you don’t have to report compliance data to any other party.

I hope this information helps. If you’re not sure then just contact your DME or sleep doctor.

Shadow of the Colossus (Or How To Freak Yourself Out By Playing A Video Game)

I consider Shadow of the Colossus to be a great and unique video game. There’s not much to it. Your character has a horse, a sword, a bow and arrow, and the ability to climb things. His task is to kill several colossi.

The size and speed of the various creatures vary with many requiring different methods of attack.

But if you have this game, especially the new PS3 version (it was originally released on the PS2), and you don’t mind being freaked out or feeling like you’re stuck on the edge of your seat, wait until 9 pm to play the game with the lights off.

There are few games that can actually make me feel tense. This is one of them. When the subject of video games as art is raised this game is almost always referenced. It has a unique atmosphere that I haven’t seen duplicated.

Its simplicity only enhances the atmosphere. Yes, there are other games that have characters fighting against monolithic creatures, but I think it’s even more unnerving because in Shadow of Colossus it’s only your character against the colossus. There are no other distractions.

Embedded below is a video of the fifth colossus in the game. Skip ahead to 3:55 for the creepy parts.

Insteon 2-Wire Dimmer or Switch Not As Easy As X10

About a year ago I started swapping out some X10 dimmer and appliance modules with new Insteon modules. They’re much more reliable and more secure than X10 gear. However, the in-wall modules have one requirement that prevents me from using them. Specifically, they require a neutral wire.

Since our home has a mix of older wiring, or the neutral wire wasn’t brought down to the switch, I can’t install most Insteon modules. I am able to use plug-in modules, which work well so I still have a mixed environment of Insteon and X10.

There are some 2-wire Insteon modules available. However, the wiring requirements aren’t as simple as those for X10 devices. I’m probably not going to purchase any of these. I may just continue using plug-in modules until we can afford to have our electrical wiring upgraded throughout the house.

The issue is that the 2-wire modules actually use two components. One component is installed at the switch and the other is installed in the electrical box at the light fixture. According to the documentation it creates a neutral wire between the two devices using the existing two wires.

This just isn’t as simple as what I’d prefer. I’m not stating that the 2-wire Insteon modules are faulty or not good. The purpose of this post is just to help others learn that using these won’t be as simple as replacing a light fixture switch.