Xbox 360 Wireless Network Adapter Won’t Connect to Xbox Live

The Short Version: I can make it work by selecting “Connect to Xbox Live”, letting it fail the test, and then choosing the option to test the connection to Xbox Live. After it completes successfully I can then connect to Xbox Live. I never found a solution to this problem.

Rather than deal with this problem indefinitely I removed the Microsoft adapter and now I’m using an ethernet to wifi bridge device, which works perfectly.

Several months ago I moved the Xbox 360 into a different room. Rather than run another network device for the only console that doesn’t have built-in wireless (I have an older model) I decided to purchase an Xbox 360 Wireless Network Adapter.

It works, but not perfectly. I haven’t identified the cause yet. It could be a compatibility issue with my Apple Airport Extreme Base Station though it may be something very obscure. It doesn’t receive a very strong WiFi signal but I wouldn’t rate as being weak.

Whenever I start the Xbox 360 up it no longer automatically logs into Xbox Live (despite being configured to do so). In addition, it won’t connect to Xbox Live just by clicking the appropriate tile.

The only way I can make it connect using the WiFi adapter is to select the option to test the connection to Xbox Live, after it fails to connect.

After the test successfully completes I can then back up to the main menu and sign into Xbox Live without problems.

Updated 06/25/2012: I still haven’t found a permanent fix for this issue. It’s as though the USB wifi adapter simply doesn’t wake up when I turn on the Xbox 360. I have to run a connection test every time to get it working. The issue isn’t caused by the Airport Extreme Base Station. It took a hit to some ethernet ports recently and is no longer in line. I’m still experiencing the same problem with my ASUS wireless router.

Updated 12/10/2012: I sold it to a friend recently and he reports that he doesn’t have this same issue. I suspect that the wifi signal where my Xbox system is located is rather weak, which creates problems for the Xbox adapter. I’m currently using an IOGear device with the Xbox and it seems to be able to connect to Xbox Live automatically at start-up.

Super Mario 3D Land, Star Fox 64 3D, Mario Kart 7 (3DS), and Mario 64 DS (DS)

The Short Version: Super Mario 3D Land, Star Fox 64 3D, Mario Kart 7, and Mario 64 DS are fun games that most gamers will probably enjoy.

It wasn’t long after I bought a Nintendo 3DS that I started buying up games that belong to series I’ve been playing much of my life (I find this an odd thing to write but it’s true – I started playing Mario games with the NES and the Mario Kart and Star Fox games on the SNES).

I don’t expect everyone to agree with my opinion of these games, but most gamers, especially long-time gamers from my generation, probably will enjoy them.

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Cataloging with Delicious Library and Home Inventory (OS X)

The Short Version: I cataloged our movies with Delicious Library 2 but needed to replicate the data in Home Inventory. Delicious Library provides an export to CSV function and Home Inventory can import CSV files. Now I have the data for our library in both programs and using an iOS program for Home Inventory I can also maintain and view a backup copy of the database on my iPhone.

I’ve had a copy of Delicious Library (version 1) for several years. It’s a well-designed commercial Mac program for cataloging  movies, CDs, games, and books. The latest version (Delicious Library 2) includes more features and categories. Both versions support barcode scanning, which I’ve always done with the built-in iSight camera. It can look-up product information using Amazon and automatically download product images, title, retail value, and other pieces of information.

A week or two ago we decided to catalog all of our movies after a visit to Wal-Mart. While there we browsed the cheap movie section but we were reluctant to purchase for fear that we already owned them. When we returned home my wife downloaded an app to her iPod for cataloging movies. I decided to open up Delicious Library and paid $15 to upgrade to the latest version.

We both spent at least a couple of hours scanning or manually entering information for our movies.

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Pilotwings Resort (3DS)

The Short Version: Someone unfamiliar with the Pilotwings series might enjoy it more than those who have played the SNES and N64 versions. I think it’s overpriced at $40 but it’s not a bad game if you can get it for about $20.

Back in the days, when the SNES was still relatively new, one my favorite games was Pilotwings. The 3-D like graphics were high-tech (for a console) at the time and I was also somewhat fond of flight simulators. It combined a handful of different skills and craft: piloting a plane, jet pack, hang glider, and skydiving. The final level involved a mission that required piloting a military helicopter to take out various targets.

I never played the Pilotwings version for the N64 very much, but from what little I did play it seemed like a fun game (I especially had fun with the cannons).

I couldn’t resist purchasing the 3DS edition of Pilotwings. Surely, it would be at least as good as the original Pilotwings, right?

One day I went up to Wal-Mart with intention of buying a copy there but when I saw the price of $40 I decided to look on Amazon.com again because I thought I had seen it for less. Sure enough, it was sold for less than $20. I ordered a copy from Amazon while I was standing in front of the games at Wal-Mart (I already had Amazon Prime so I had 2-day shipping for no extra charge).

It turns out that Pilotwings Resort wasn’t quite the game I was expecting. Now, it’s not a bad game. In fact, if you’ve never played the Pilotwings series you might enjoy it more than I did. After all, I already had expectations for the game to live up to.

In my opinion it’s a mediocre game. I was expecting it to be a combination of the original SNES version and the N64 version, but it’s not. It is very similar to the SNES version with some additional craft and challenges, but as far as I can tell (I haven’t reached the final section) it’s missing the more fun elements from the N64 version.

I don’t think it’s worth $40. But it’s an OK game at $20.