My Apparent Change of Response to Nicotine Intake via Electronic Cigarette

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Disclaimer: I’m not a doctor. I have no medical training. Nothing I’ve mentioned in this section was done for any kind of scientific study, monitored, or verified by others. The information below details only my personal assumptions, experiences, and opinions.

I’ve been using electronic cigarettes for several years. Whether or not they have any significant and long-term negative health affects is somewhat uncertain. I, like many other e-cig users, assume that any potential problems caused by using e-cigs will always be far less severe than the known risks that are associated with smoking regular cigarettes (sometimes jokingly called “analog cigarettes”). Hopefully, this will prove to be the case several years from now.

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Current Electronic Cigarette Equipment (e-Cig)

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Back in September of 2010 I preferred to use a KR808D e-cig model and related equipment. However, since my preferred e-cig store stopped carrying that model I switched over to a Joye eGo. I’ve actually been more pleased with the reliability of the Joye eGo gear in comparison to the KR808D (though I wish the atomizers lasted longer).

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Using an Electronic Cigarette (and what works for myself)

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Updated 08/27/2011: Several months ago PureSmoker stopped carrying most of the Ace parts. I’ve had a good experience purchasing from them so I switched over to the Joy eGO model, which actually works better than the Ace though it’s a larger size. I’ve included new details in another post.

I’ve been using an electronic cigarette (eCig) off-and-on for nearly two years. At one point I went six months without a “real” cigarette. I’ve gone back to using them again and this time it’s sticking better now that I’ve discovered better brands/suppliers. I’m not going to get into the details of how an eCig works or what a cartomizer or atomizer is. There are plenty of other sites that explain these in better detail.

My first eCig was an NJOY NPRO. The original starter kits, which included two batteries, at least one atomizer, five cartridges, and a charging set, cost about $80. A pack of ten cartridges cost $20. Each cartridge was marketed as being the equivalent of a pack of cigarettes, but in my experience that was never the case. I stuck with the brand for a long time and by the time I stopped using NJOY products I purchased two starter kits, bought a used one from a friend, and purchased at least four more express kits ($35 each with fewer pieces). I don’t even know how much I spent on cartridge packs.

I had learned to save money by purchasing “smoke juice” (the liquid included in cartridges) and refilling my own. I also started buying blank cartridges and filled those myself. I also started buy atomizers from another company, which saved some money. Eventually, I was even able to buy third-party “cartomizers”. However, in the end, the high rate of failure (off all parts) and the cost was too much to deal with.

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