Game Streaming from an Xbox One to a MacBook Air (11 inch, mid-2013) using Windows 10 (Boot Camp)

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The Short Version: I was able to successfully use Xbox One Game Streaming using Windows 10 via Boot Camp (OS X El Capitan) on my MacBook Air (11 inch, mid-2013) with 8 GBs of RAM and the Medium quality setting with only minor audio lag and no noticeable video lag.

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JBL Portable Bluetooth Speaker

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A couple of months ago I finally decided it might be convenient to have a portable Bluetooth speaker that I could use to play music from my phone or other device. The idea was that it would be something I could use when we’re playing a card game or outside grilling. After scrolling through numerous reviews on Amazon I encountered this little device, which I eventually received as a gift from my wish list.

The JBL Micro Wireless Ultra-Portable Speaker provides amazing sound considering its size. According to the documentation it will run on battery for about five hours, though some reviewers have experienced longer usage times. It’s also possible to use the device while recharging it.

Considering its size and relatively low cost (about $50), I am very impressed by this piece of tech. So was my wife. The first time I tried it out she immediately stated that she wants one. Friends have made similar comments when showing it to them.

There are other very similar JBL models. This particular one has a built-in bass port.

It’s been useful in cases when I didn’t expect it. For example, the turn-by-turn navigation instructions from Google Maps sounded excellent.

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The Pitfalls of Relying on CPAP Machine Stats

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I’ve been managing obstructive sleep apnea for several years and I’ve learned a great deal over time. One of the more recent things I’ve come to realize in the past couple of years is that CPAP machine stats aren’t the only factor that should be used to determine how effective a treatment is working.

If you take the time to browse CPAP patient forums you’ll soon learn that the various machines calculate statistics in different ways. Between two different models in the same line I can estimate there’s at least a difference of two or three units for the value of the nightly AHI numbers. For example, my wife’s S9 appears to be lower than my own S8. Obviously I can’t account for the difference in severity between our cases of sleep apnea but I’m fairly certain, based on forum posts, that the S9’s reported numbers are typically lower. In my opinion, lower values reported by the S9 make it more difficult to pin-point problems because it offers a narrower range in which swings can be detected.

There are several factors to consider. For example, though an AHI may appear low this can be misleading if the leak rate is very high. I consider the AHI value more reliable when I have a very low leak rate.

One should also be mindful of the fact that home devices do not track the same array of data that is gathered in a sleep study. It’s possible that some information won’t reveal problems that might be obvious when compared against data collected in a lab setting (O2 levels, sleep stages, etc).

Sleep stats aren’t enough and simply don’t reveal everything. The quality of the sleep isn’t something that I can track at home. Yes, I can see if there were severe problems with leaks or high AHI values, but my machine can’t really track sleep stages (these can only be inferred to a minor degree) or the quality of my sleep.

I think most experienced CPAP users will agree that statistics are helpful but the most important factor for determining effectiveness is simply how good you feel in general.

With my machine I’ve learned that I’ll feel alright with an AHI below 3 and I typically feel very good if it’s below 2. Anything consistently above a 4 will begin to wear me down. Note that these numbers are well within the “normal” range.

Updated 06/25/2012: But the stats can be very helpful at times as well. If you look at the pressure a machine is using to stop events then you may figure out that your lowest pressure setting should be increased. Over in relevant forums many users have stated that what often happens is that a machine doesn’t ramp up to the necessary pressure in time to stop many events. For example, if your minimum pressure is 6 (with a max of 15) and the majority of your logged events require a pressure of 12 then it’s possible that there are several events at or above that pressure and the machine simply isn’t ramping up enough in time. For example, if the machine is at 6 and only reaches 9 before the event naturally ends (your brain tells your body to breathe, thus disrupting your sleep) then it may not be effective enough. In such a case it may be wise to have your lowest pressure increased to a value closer to the average pressure needed to prevent events.

Reducing Streaming Video Quality (Netflix and Hulu)

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A few weeks ago I adjusted our Netflix Instant Watch streaming quality to the medium setting. My ISP doesn’t have a data cap, at least not yet, but I figured it might not hurt to conserve bandwidth.

Today I logged in and changed it to the lowest quality setting. It’s possible that the Apple TV is ignoring the setting, but as far as I can tell the quality is actually still good. I’m going to try leaving this setting in place and wait to see how it works out. Going from the medium setting estimated to use about .7 GB/hour down to the low setting of .3 GB/hour may help keep our video streaming under our ISP’s radar, which is a greater concern now that we use video streaming in place of cable/satellite TV.

Last week I reduced the quality of video from Hulu, though it had less to do with conserving bandwidth and more to do with the fact that our Tivo seems to have trouble maintaining the Hulu stream from time-to-time.

Updated 10/09/2011: I’ve been using these settings for several months and have hardly even noticed a difference.