Using a Multi-Color LED Bulb to Visually Indicate the High Temperature Range for the Day (Zipato RGBW LED & Indigo 6)

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In the morning, when I first get up, I walk past a motion sensor. A moment later a lamp with a color-changing bulb illuminates, glowing a specific color to indicate the temperature range that will include today’s forecast high temperature. With just one glance I know whether or not I should take a jacket before I step outside.

It’s been a long time since I last spent any significant amount of time focused on home automation but I recently made up for lost time by eliminating the last of my Insteon gear. All of the home automation gear is now Z-Wave compatible. But why stop there and not take the opportunity to add new enhancements?

In general, I’m uninterested in bulbs that can be directly controlled themselves, such as Z-Wave or wifi enabled light bulbs. They certainly have their applications but I don’t find them very practical for normal use. They still require that a light switch is left in the ON position in order to function. This breaks down very quickly when guests come to visit. For example, even with a remotely controlled lamp on an appliance or dimming module I often discover that instead of using the provided remotes our guests have simply turned the guest room lamp off using the traditional lamp switch. It’s just a normal, reasonable action.

My reason for purchasing a Z-Wave controlled, color-changing LED bulb certainly wasn’t a typical one. In this case I purchased one to use with my home automation system as a supplemental notification method, though for this particular project it is actually the only notification method used.

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Accessing Windows 7 VPN Server When DHCP Fails (PPTP)

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The Short Version: If your VPN client fails to obtain an IP address via DHPC when connecting to a Windows 7 VPN server using PPTP, it may be possible to connect to the server over RDP by accessing it at 169.254.128.230 if your client is assigned an IP in the same network range.

Last night I was logged into my Windows 7 desktop system back home, which runs my home automation software and acts as a VPN server. I recently had to setup the VPN server again and was trying to troubleshoot the problem of VPN clients not receiving DNS server addresses from the server.

At one point I changed the server configuration from providing a specific range of IP addresses to instead provide IPs via DHCP. After making this change I could still connect to the VPN but my client received a 169.254.128.x address and I could no longer access the server over RDP at the previous address.

I was accustomed to thinking of the 169.254.x.x range as being a sign of a problem and not as a useable network range so I kept trying to access the original, internal network via various methods (trying to override my VPN client assigned IP, using a virtual machine with a shared network connection but on the original network). I even tried to RDP to 169.254.128.1 but it also failed.

Finally, at some point I realized that there was an entry for a default gateway in my VPN client settings. In my case it was pointing to 169.254.128.230. I’m not sure if this is always the case.

When I entered this address into the RDP client I was able to connect and then set the server back to distributing the specific range of IP addresses that were previously defined, instead of using DHCP.

I haven’t resolved the original problem but I was able to get back into the machine and restore the VPN setting.

The Pitfalls of Relying on CPAP Machine Stats

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I’ve been managing obstructive sleep apnea for several years and I’ve learned a great deal over time. One of the more recent things I’ve come to realize in the past couple of years is that CPAP machine stats aren’t the only factor that should be used to determine how effective a treatment is working.

If you take the time to browse CPAP patient forums you’ll soon learn that the various machines calculate statistics in different ways. Between two different models in the same line I can estimate there’s at least a difference of two or three units for the value of the nightly AHI numbers. For example, my wife’s S9 appears to be lower than my own S8. Obviously I can’t account for the difference in severity between our cases of sleep apnea but I’m fairly certain, based on forum posts, that the S9’s reported numbers are typically lower. In my opinion, lower values reported by the S9 make it more difficult to pin-point problems because it offers a narrower range in which swings can be detected.

There are several factors to consider. For example, though an AHI may appear low this can be misleading if the leak rate is very high. I consider the AHI value more reliable when I have a very low leak rate.

One should also be mindful of the fact that home devices do not track the same array of data that is gathered in a sleep study. It’s possible that some information won’t reveal problems that might be obvious when compared against data collected in a lab setting (O2 levels, sleep stages, etc).

Sleep stats aren’t enough and simply don’t reveal everything. The quality of the sleep isn’t something that I can track at home. Yes, I can see if there were severe problems with leaks or high AHI values, but my machine can’t really track sleep stages (these can only be inferred to a minor degree) or the quality of my sleep.

I think most experienced CPAP users will agree that statistics are helpful but the most important factor for determining effectiveness is simply how good you feel in general.

With my machine I’ve learned that I’ll feel alright with an AHI below 3 and I typically feel very good if it’s below 2. Anything consistently above a 4 will begin to wear me down. Note that these numbers are well within the “normal” range.

Updated 06/25/2012: But the stats can be very helpful at times as well. If you look at the pressure a machine is using to stop events then you may figure out that your lowest pressure setting should be increased. Over in relevant forums many users have stated that what often happens is that a machine doesn’t ramp up to the necessary pressure in time to stop many events. For example, if your minimum pressure is 6 (with a max of 15) and the majority of your logged events require a pressure of 12 then it’s possible that there are several events at or above that pressure and the machine simply isn’t ramping up enough in time. For example, if the machine is at 6 and only reaches 9 before the event naturally ends (your brain tells your body to breathe, thus disrupting your sleep) then it may not be effective enough. In such a case it may be wise to have your lowest pressure increased to a value closer to the average pressure needed to prevent events.

Changing CPAP (APAP) Minimum Pressure Range

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In general, I’d recommend against doing exactly what I’ve done. However, my recent journey into tracking sleep stats provided me with information that I used to determine, on my own, what might be a better pressure range.

While reviewing data from 17 nights I realized that on 14 of those nights the average pressure used was above 9. In addition, in cpaptalk.com forums I read some accounts in which several individuals suggested that lower minimum pressure settings can be a problem for some people.

Specifically, the idea is that if a pressure of 9 is needed to clear the airway, but the minimum starting pressure is 6, then it may be taking the CPAP too long to detect that a higher pressure is needed. By the time the unit ramps up the pressure the apnea or hypopnea event may already be over due to the body’s automatic response.

I’ve used this range two nights in a row and I do seem to have experienced an improvement in my sleep.

Updated 10/12/2011: My opinion regarding exercising the ability to change machine settings has changed slightly. Visit my page on living with a CPAP for more information.

Switching From A ResMed Mirage Quattro to a Fisher and Paykel Forma (Full Face CPAP Masks)

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I’ve been relatively pleased with the ResMed Mirage Quattro Full Face Mask, especially compared to the ResMed Ultra Mirage Full Face Mask. The Ultra was prone to breaking near the forehead piece, which can be expensive enough when one already needs to replace the headgear and the mask seal from time-to-time on both masks (and probably almost any CPAP mask).

A little over a week ago I decided to look at getting a different type of mask. I knew there was room for improvement, especially after having some bad nights. I also wanted to have at least one spare mask around. Trying to get through even one night without it would be very difficult.

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